Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis

Have you ever come across someone suffering from a skin condition called Seborrheic Keratosis? The irritation and devastation it wrecks havoc to the skin, causing unsightly skin lesions will make you take pause. So In this post, we look at what seborrheic keratosis is, what causes seborrheic keratosis and how to treat it.

What Is Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic keratosis, (pronounced as seb-o-REE-ik ker-uh-TOE-sis) is one of the most common noncancerous skin growths in older adults. And if you are seeing seborrheic keratosis for the first time, the infected skin area usually appears as a brown, black or light tan growth on the face, chest, shoulders or back. The common feature for their growth is a distinct waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance they all carry.

Seborrheic Keratosis Causes

Here are the causes of Seborrheic Keratosis among many:

1: Seborrheic keratoses seem to run in families.

Families that have had an experience with Seborrheic Keratoses seem to be more susceptible to suffer from this skin infection though the exact cause of seborrheic keratoses isn’t known.

The other common factor for Seborrheic Keratoses is how very common and generally, increased cases in family members who are old aged.

Is Seborrheic Keratoses Contagious?

No! The lesions of Seborrheic Keratosis aren’t contagious. In fact, what tends to happen is that families with a historical infection among the members seem to be more susceptible to Seborrheic Keratoses.

With that said, there is enough evidence to make the case for Seborrheic Keratosis being hereditary as it tends to run in some families more than others where no historical data proves so.

How do you remove seborrheic keratosis?

The procedure of removing seborrheic keratoses is pretty much similar to the way how warts are removed off your skin, except that with seborrheic it is much quicker.

Here’s how your doctor removes seborrheic keratoses with the help of these battle-tested methods, including:

1: Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery).

2: Scraping the skin’s surface with a special instrument,

(This process of removing seborrheic keratoses is also called curettage).

3: Burning with an electric current,

(this is also known as electrocautery treatment).

4: Vaporizing the growth with a laser

(this treatment is also known as ablation).

The goal for applying all these procedures is to make sure that the infected skin can be scraped (curettage) or shaved off with a special cutting instrument, hence the improved look of the area cosmetically.

Can Picking off seborrheic keratosis Help?

Yes, picking of seborrheic keratoses helps remove the infected skin, however, there is a process for doing this which involves with the freezing of the area being treated, all this is usually done for cosmetic reasons and not otherwise.

According to Harvard health publication, about 90% of the time Seborrheic Keratoses is frozen off first before picking off the lesions raised skin on the area of infection.

Treatment

Treatment of Keratoses is a long term process that begins with the Freezing of the infected skin areas as explained in how seborrheic keratoses is removed above.

This is only done in a controlled area by a competent trained cosmetologist doctor who will use liquid nitrogen to perform the cryosurgery.

With Seborrheic keratoses, Cryosurgery is probably the most effective way to completely remove seborrheic keratoses, long before beginning the skin rehabilitation with the help of a plethora of over the counter seborrheic keratoses.

This form of treating Seborrheic keratoses infection is pretty much standard whether you are treating the skin beginning with Scraping the skin’s surface using a special instrument, (curettage).
Or, when burning the seborrheic keratosis skin with an electric current, (electrocautery).

Is There An Over The Counter Treatment For Seborrheic Keratosis?

Yes! Eskata (Available here on Amazon) which is an FDA approved over the counter Topical treatment with concentrated hydrogen peroxide 40% solution can be used to treat Seborrheic Keratoses.

On the other hand, Tazarotene cream 0.1% is yet another over the counter which is up and coming according to published reports.
Research shows that when these two creams were used, applying twice daily for up to 16 weeks caused clinical improvement in seborrheic keratoses in 7 out of 15 patients. This is what also led the 2017 United States of America’s Food and Drug Administration, (FDA) to approve (Eskata) for adults suffering from raised seborrheic keratosis.

Can Seborrheic Keratosis Go Away By Itself?

No! Seborrheic keratoses do not go away on their own, however, in the event that skin lesions caused by Keratoses become unbearable to look at, there are ways you could use to remove the infected skin with the help of a qualified cosmetologist doctor.
Let’s face it, the look of seborrheic is not pleasing! It’s, irritating and flat out unsightly, and that is why anyone with seborrheic keratoses has to be removed.

All in all, there is no harm if seborrheic keratosis is left untreated throughout their growths because they are benign (noncancerous) and do not become cancerous.

10 Best Seborrheic Keratosis Removal Cream

1: AMELIORATE Transforming Body Cream 225ml

2: Eucerin 10Pct Urea Ointment 100ml

3: G16 Skin Repair Lotion

4: ESKATA® (hydrogen peroxide) topical solution, 40%

5: BRIOGEO B. Well Tea Tree Oil

6: Derm-Essentials for Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

7: Derma Solve Psoriasis, Seborrheic Dermatitis & Dandruff Cream.

8: pHat 5.5 Seborrheic Dermatitis Hair Deep Conditioning Treatment.

9: Gold Cosmetics & Skin Care SEBORRHEA CREAM

What to Look For When Buying Best Seborrheic Treatment Creams And Wash?

Make sure that your choice of seborrheic treatment has the following Beauty Product Attributes:

1: Organic

2: Natural

3: Paraben Free

4: Sulfate Free

5: Hypoallergenic

7: Unscented

8: Fragrance-Free

And there you have it! Thanks for showing up and if you found this helpful, please share and subscribe! Bye

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